Places to visit in Brighton

ALL SAINTS CHURCH

All Saints is the main Anglican church in Hove and has been the parish church since 1892. The parish of Hove and Preston has been united since 1531 and work started on the new church on this site in 1889 to cope with the increasing population. The church is a large gothic style structure although the planned tower was never completed. In addition to the regular services which are held here the building is also used for theatre productions, dinners and music events. Sadly, on Christmas Day in 2013 there was a break-in which led to a stained glass window being smashed which set back the church’s £45,000 appeal to raise funds to repair windows in the sanctuary area which is still on-going.

There is no admission charge for entry but donations are always welcome. The church is open every day of the week and there are services each day which are listed on the church’s web-site.

BOOTH MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

The Booth Museum was founded in 1874 by Richard Booth and focuses on all aspects of natural history, from birds to fossils and from butterflies to skeletons. Booth’s own particular interest was in ornithology and there is a very Victorian feel to the museum, with the various displays. There is also a more modern mission behind the museum, which aims to promote conservation and tries to make the temporary exhibitions have more of a modern feel. A visit is recommended although the new closure at lunch can be a little awkward for visitors to work around.

There is no admission charge for entry and the museum is open six days a week, being closed only on Thursdays. The museum is open from 10.00 until 12.00 and from 13.15 until 17.00 on Mondays to Saturdays (other than Thursdays when it is closed all day) and from 14.00 until 17.00 on Sundays.

BRIGHTON PIER

This was once known as the Palace Pier before the steady decline of the West Pier meant that it became better known as just Brighton Pier. Work started on the pier in 1891 with the concert hall opened at the end of the structure in 1893. Today there are numerous eating places along the 1,772-foot long pier, with a fairground at the end and various stalls along the length. A visit to the pier is recommended, but some of the rides can be expensive (although all day passes are available for £15 on weekdays and £17.50 on weekends), although some discounts are available for booking in advance online.

There is no admission charge for entrance and the pier is open every day of the year other than Christmas Day. Opening hours can vary, and the various attractions along the pier have different opening times, but generally the opening hours are 10.00 until 22.00 every day.

CHAPEL ROYAL

This was once known as the Palace Pier before the steady decline of the West Pier meant that it became better known as just Brighton Pier. Work started on the pier in 1891 with the concert hall opened at the end of the structure in 1893. Today there are numerous eating places along the 1,772-foot long pier, with a fairground at the end and various stalls along the length. A visit to the pier is recommended, but some of the rides can be expensive (although all day passes are available for £15 on weekdays and £17.50 on weekends), although some discounts are available for booking in advance online.

There is no admission charge for entrance and the pier is open every day of the year other than Christmas Day. Opening hours can vary, and the various attractions along the pier have different opening times, but generally the opening hours are 10.00 until 22.00 every day.

FISHING MUSEUM

The fishing museum aims to tell the story of Brighton’s history with the sea from the origins of Brighthelmstone and the fledgling industry through to the twentieth century. There is a 27-foot long clinker built punt boat as well as hundreds of other exhibits, and it also tells the story of how many fishermen transformed their boats from fishing craft into touring boats for tourists. The museum is well laid out and is recommended, especially given that there is no entrance charge.

There is no admission charge for entrance and the museum is open seven days a week. The opening hours vary slightly depending on volunteers (who are welcoming and really engage about the subject), but the museum is generally open throughout the day.

HOVE MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY

Hove Museum and Art Gallery is situated in what was originally a Victorian villa called Brooker Hall and the building was used in the First World War to house German prisoners of war. It was purchased in 1926 by Hove Corporation and the following year was opened as a museum. There are a range of displays covering not just the local history of the area, but also special collections relating to toys, cinema, crafts and fine art. The museum is quite small and the displays are a little bit random but in many ways this adds to the charm. There is also a café here, run by the London company of Peyton and Byrne, which offers a range of light meals and snacks and which also specialises in tea with over twenty varieties available to choose from.

There is no admission charge for entrance and the museum is open on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays (closed all day on Wednesdays) from 10.00 until 17.00 and on Sundays from 14.00 until 17.00. There are occasionally events and special exhibitions which are chargeable, but tickets are available on-site in the museum gift shop.

MECHANICAL MEMORIES MUSEUM

This small museum has a range of penny arcade machines which can still be played on, although sometimes several can be out of order and awaiting repair. The museum has done well to survive as it has had financial difficulties in the past, and the rent in its current location is expensive. Although there is limited space in the museum it is worth a visit and children are likely to find the machines intriguing. The museum closed for much of 2014 following serious storm damage but perseverance helped the owners keep it running.

There is no admission charge for entrance and the museum is open from 12.00 until 18.00 every day of the week, although in winter months the museum can be closed during inclement weather. The museum does charge for old pennies (£2 for 20) to put into the machines which is its primary form of income.

Leave a Reply